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Posts Tagged ‘United States’

The Blob

In Uncategorized on April 4, 2012 at 6:53 pm
Cover of "The Blob - Criterion Collection...

Cover of The Blob - Criterion Collection

The Blob – July 20, 1957. In the small Pennsylvania town of Downington, teenager Steve Andrews (Steve McQueen) and his girlfriend Jane Martin (Aneta Corsaut) are out parking and see a falling star. They drive out to try to find where the meteor landed. An old man (Olin Howland) has heard the meteor crash near his house. He finds the meteor and pokes it with a stick. The rock breaks open to reveal a small jelly-like blob inside. This Blob, a living creature, crawls up the stick and attaches itself to his hand. Unable to scrape or shake it loose (and apparently now in pain), the old man runs hysterically onto the road, where he is seen by Steve, who takes him to see the local doctor, Doctor Hallen.

They reach the clinic when Doc Hallen is about to leave. Hallen anesthetizes the man and sends Steve back to the crash site to gather more information. Hallen decides he must amputate the man’s arm which is being consumed by the Blob, calling in his nurse. However, the Blob completely consumes the old man. Now an amorphous creature, it eats the nurse and the doctor while increasing in size.

Steve and Jane return to the office and Steve witnesses the doctor’s death. They go to the local police and return to the clinic with the kindly Lt. Dave (Earl Rowe) and cynical Sgt. Bert (John Benson). However, there is no sign of the creature or the doctor, and the police dismiss Steve’s story. Steve and Jane are sent home with their fathers but sneak out and retrieve Steve’s friends and successfully enlist their help warning the town.

In the meantime, the Blob has consumed a mechanic, the janitor in Mr. Andrew’s grocery store, and a bar room of late-night drinkers.

Investigating, Steve and Jane are confronted by the Blob in the grocery store and seek refuge in the walk-in refrigerator. The Blob starts to ooze in under the door but then retreats. Steve and Jane escape and set off the town’s fire and air-raid alarms. The whole town gathers and demands to know what is going on. As the townspeople and police angrily confront Steve, the Blob enters the Colonial Theater which is showing horror classic Daughter of Horror engulfing and eating the projectionist before oozing into the cinema seating area.

The patrons run screaming out of the theater, alerting the assembled townspeople to the danger. The Blob leaves the theater, but Jane’s little brother appears from the crowd to confront the Blob with his cap gun before running into the adjacent diner. Jane and Steve run in after him but become trapped along with the owner and a waitress.

The Blob (now an enormous mass from all the people it consumed) engulfs the diner and begins to ooze in through the windows while the occupants seek refuge in the cellar. The police try to kill the Blob by dropping a power line onto it, but this fails and only sets the diner ablaze. Defending themselves inside, the diner’s owner uses a CO2 fire extinguisher attempting to put out the fire, which also causes the approaching Blob to recoil. Steve remembers that the Blob retreated from the refrigerator, too, and tells Lt. Dave that the Blob apparently cannot stand the cold (“CO2, Dave, CO2!”). Jane’s father, Mr. Martin (Elbert Smith), takes Steve’s friends to the high school to retrieve fire extinguishers which are used to freeze the Blob. Dave requests an Air Force jet to transport the Blob to the North Pole to keep it frozen. A military plane is shown dropping the Blob into an Arctic landscape. The film ends with the “The End”

Directed by – Irvin S. Yeaworth Jr.-
Russell S. Doughten Jr.

Writers
Theodore Simonson and
Kate Phillips

Original idea
Irvine H. Millgate

Producers
Russell Doughten
Jack H. Harris

Cast
Steven McQueen
Aneta Corsaut
Earl Rowe
Olin Howlin
Steven Chase
John Benson
George Karas
Lee Payton

Original Music
Ralph Carmichael

Cinematographers
Thomas Spalding

Editors
Alfred Hillmann

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Untitled

In Uncategorized on April 4, 2012 at 5:34 pm
editors performing at mercury prize show

editors performing at mercury prize show (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Untitled

A filmmaker, his girlfriend, his female colleague, and their rich producer are to spend a weekend making a documentary within an isolated haunted cottage in Wales. While a developing love-triangle creates tension between the foursome, they soon have to begin fighting for their survival against the dangerous supernatural forces inside the cottage…

Directed by
Shaun Troke

Writers
Steven Jarrett
Steven Jarrett
Shaun Troke

Producers
Stewart Kennedy
Michael Lonsdale
Shaun Troke

Cast
Sabrina Dickens
Paul Fields
Danny Goldberg
Nikki Harrup
Holly Kenyon
Leonora Moore
Laurence Patrick
Steve Purbrick
Shaun Troke

Cinematographers
Shaun Troke

Editors
Shaun Troke

An art film

In Uncategorized on April 4, 2012 at 4:49 pm
Art in 3200

Art in 3200 (Photo credit: kevin dooley)

An art film (also known as art movie, specialty film, art house film, or in the collective sense as art cinema) is the result of filmmaking which is typically a serious, independent film aimed at a niche market rather than a mass market audience. Film critics and film studies scholars typically define an “art film” using a “…canon of films and those formal qualities that mark them as different from mainstream Hollywood films”, which includes, among other elements: a social realism style; an emphasis on the authorial expressivity of the director; and a focus on the thoughts and dreams of characters, rather than presenting a clear, goal-driven story. Film scholar David Bordwell claims that “art cinema itself is a film genre, with its own distinct conventions.”

Art film producers usually present their films at specialty theatres (repertory cinemas, or in the U.S. “arthouse cinemas”) and film festivals. The term art film is much more widely used in the United States and the UK than in Europe, where the term is more associated with “auteur” films and “national cinema” (e.g., German national cinema). Art films are aimed at small niche market audiences, which means they can rarely get the financial backing which will permit large production budgets, expensive special effects, costly celebrity actors, or huge advertising campaigns, as are used in widely-released mainstream blockbuster films. Art film directors make up for these constraints by creating a different type of film, which typically uses lesser-known film actors (or even amateur actors) and modest sets to make films which focus much more on developing ideas or exploring new narrative techniques or filmmaking conventions.

Furthermore, a certain degree of experience and intellect are required to understand or appreciate such films; one mid-1990s art film was called “largely a cerebral experience” which you enjoy “because of what you know about film”.This contrasts sharply with mainstream “blockbuster” films, which are geared more towards escapism and pure entertainment. For promotion, art films rely on the publicity generated from film critics’ reviews, discussion of their film by arts columnists, commentators and bloggers, and “word-of-mouth” promotion by audience members. Since art films have small initial investment costs, they only need to appeal to a small portion of the mainstream viewing audiences to become financially viable.

An Independent film

In Uncategorized on April 4, 2012 at 4:36 pm
Dionysus (Richard Werner) in The Bacchae, dire...

Dionysus (Richard Werner) in The Bacchae, directed by Brad Mays, 2000. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

An Independent film is a professional film production resulting in a feature film that is produced mostly or completely outside of the major film studio system. In addition to being produced and distributed by independent entertainment companies, independent films are also produced and/or distributed by subsidiaries of major film studios. Independent films are sometimes distinguishable by their content and style and the way in which the filmmakers’ personal artistic vision is realized. Usually, but not always, independent films are made with considerably lower film budgets than major studio films.[1] Generally, the marketing of independent films is characterized by limited release, but can also have major marketing campaigns and a wide release. Independent films are often screened at local, national, or international film festivals before distribution (theatrical and/or retail release). An independent film production can rival a mainstream film production if it has the necessary funding and distribution.